Zendrum Forums

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Fun recording story  (Read 647 times)

Jaay

  • Tribesman
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 241
    • View Profile
Fun recording story
« on: March 26, 2011, 07:47:25 AM »

I had an interesting experience last night I wanted to share.

I decided it was time to update my demo reel, so I loaded some tracks into my iPod, set up my recording rig and set to.  I recorded a percussion track, a kind of poppy-sounding track, some funk, and some slow opera-rock (last one I need to redo).

When I did the percussion track, I was using pads that were at all corners of the instrument because that's where my setup was.  Here's the problem: this was at midnight, I was really tired, and I kept missing the pads!

At first I was berating myself, but then I started thinking about how I would handle it if someone were paying me to record this track as a Session Guy.  I thought, "okay, I'm recording this to display.  Am I ever going to play it live?  Maybe, maybe not, but right now the clock is running and this guy wants the track done".  So I started moving some pads around.  Instead of having the djembe in the lower corner (F3 and L4/5), the snare drum up on L1 and my cymbals and gong on the lower tail in the R pads, I moved everything to the Fs and Ts and consolidated it to where all the instruments I needed were within a handspan. I also had a bit of a musical epiphany while I was there but that's beyond the scope of this post.

When it came time for the pop track I had a similar problem.  I had to do a run down the toms on my C pads and then jump to my cross-stick on L4; kept missing it.  So instead I moved it over to R1 where it was the next pad in line and I nailed it.  

I moved everything back after I finished recording because those are my live setups and I'm used to them.  At first I almost felt like I was cheating, but then I realized that I can't cheat on my own recordings and that were this a situation I was getting paid for, those fixes might have saved my gig.  

I don't mess around much with setups but I'm glad I did this time; I think the ability to adapt your settings is a skill that requires just as much practice as playing the instrument and last night was a good lesson for it.

Hope everyone enjoyed reading.  Be well.

-Jaay
Logged
"Batman Purple" ZX, Roland TD-9, MIDI Solutions Footswitch Controller, misc. triggers.

Pyrate

  • Tribal Elder
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 528
    • View Profile
Re: Fun recording story
« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2011, 08:26:32 AM »

Avast Thar MAtey,

     Now you be obligated to the tribe to tell us what the epiphany was.

Fair Winds and Following Seas,
Pyrate
Logged
Lost at sea with the Jolly Roger Zendrum!
Pyrate Factoid:  Black Bart Roberts was the most successful Pyrate of the Golden Age.  He captured over 400 ships between 1720 and 1722.

Jaay

  • Tribesman
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 241
    • View Profile
Re: Fun recording story
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2011, 08:38:01 AM »

Avast Thar MAtey,

     Now you be obligated to the tribe to tell us what the epiphany was.

Fair Winds and Following Seas,
Pyrate

Aye, Cap'n!

The percussion track I ws doing had a djembe part in it, and I was trying very hard to go for a heavy tribal feel, emphasize the accents and leave the non-accented notes feeling like ghost notes almost. 

I think this occurred to me because there was a click track on the recording, but somehow I got the idea to keep more of a drumline mentality in my head while I played and not the hip tribal feel; instead of trying to go for that loping feeling dynamically, even it out and go for precision.  I did, and it worked a lot better. I'm not sure how trying to be more precise would make it feel more relaxed, but I suppose that's another mystery of music I'll never understand.
Logged
"Batman Purple" ZX, Roland TD-9, MIDI Solutions Footswitch Controller, misc. triggers.

Pocket Master

  • Tribal Leader
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 442
    • View Profile
    • Pocket Master
Re: Fun recording story
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2011, 09:26:37 AM »

I have to say that I don't think there is any way to really cheat on the Zendrum.  I am constantly changing up pads on my ZX for whatever the song calls for.  If I need a snare rimshot with a crash but my crash a snare are too far apart or my hands are not where they need to be for that in time, I make a sample of the snare and crash together, program it to a pad, and hit one pad for the two sounds, to some that may be considered cheating, but when you hear it on the recording, nobody knows but me.  When I play live, my hands are moving so fast that most people can't even tell which pad is making what sound, so it doesn't matter there either.

I play with many bands that do different styles of music, I have my main pad layout but I make certain changes and add or take away certain drums that I will or won't use for that group.  It doesn't make sense to load an instrument in my software and take up the memory if I am not going to use it.

Rob
Logged
Zebrawood ZX-Z4, 30 Triggers, Honey Sunburst Flame Maple ZX-Z4, 29 Triggers on the ZX BABY!!!!, Apple® MacBook® Pro, Ableton Live, Superior Drummer 2.0 with expansion packs, BFD2, Internal Wireless Midijet Pro, Roland FC-300 MIDI Foot Controller, QSC K12 and Ksub

DrumWagon

  • Administrator
  • Tribal Leader
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 369
    • View Profile
    • ZenEdit, the Premiere Zendrum Editor.
Re: Fun recording story
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2011, 11:10:05 AM »

Just wanted to chime in here about the extensive setup copying and the pad swap features available in ZenEdit.

These were added to promote just such experimentation  ;D

http://nebiru.com/zenedit/index.cfm?event=features
Logged
◊ Creator of ZenEdit, the Premiere Zendrum Editing Suite: http://nebiru.com/zenedit/

Ask me about:
Zendrum ZX 4.0 -- Roland TDW-20, SPD-S, SPD-11 -- Alesis DM-Pro -- E-MU Planet Earth, Protean Drums -- BFD2, Battery 3
Pages: [1]   Go Up