Zendrum Forums

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  
Pages: 1 ... 6 7 [8] 9 10
 71 
 on: November 23, 2013, 08:33:46 PM 
Started by jonathanm - Last post by randtor
Hey Jonathan,

I am left handed as well, and I always play with the left end of the zendrum "up", at my left shoulder. I think that's generally the position everyone uses though, isn't it? I sometimes use the ZX up at a higher or lower angle depending on the song and what I am trying to accomplish. Lately I've been using it sitting down, on keyboard "x" holder, and using foot pedals for kick and hi hat which allows me more freedom to use my hands for everything else. Its different than what I have been doing for 6-7 years, but I think I like it... so far!
Good luck!
Rand

 72 
 on: November 19, 2013, 07:39:14 PM 
Started by Pyrate - Last post by digitalDrummer
How are you powering your Zendrum while using the CME x8? I think MIDI JET will provide a power option if you ask them - they did for my review sample.

 73 
 on: November 19, 2013, 01:04:23 AM 
Started by Jaay - Last post by bluesapostle2
I love BFD3!!!!!!!!!!!!! :D

 74 
 on: November 19, 2013, 01:02:39 AM 
Started by Pyrate - Last post by bluesapostle2
After using the CME X8 for a while I am very satisfied! It is a nice alternative to the embedded wireless as I am not in the US and able to get my Zendrum in the shop.

 75 
 on: November 16, 2013, 12:39:37 PM 
Started by Jaay - Last post by DrumWagon
This could be the beginning of your journey to the dark side :)

I still recall the day a few years back that I finally got sick of the Roland sounds.  At first it was the snares, then it was the crashes and finally it was the toms.  There are still some percussion sounds of Roland that I like (and use samples of), but once I went through the initial pain of switching to BFD I never looked back.

Seeing as how you're still using the Z3 though, I presume investing more money in your rig is not an option and you'll want to make do with your TD-9 for a while longer.  One trick I used to do with my TD-20 was to assign different articulations to each hand.  I have a closed and an open HH trigger on each side of my Zendrum.  My right hand would use the tight closed bow sound (42 on the TD-9) and the open edge (26) while my left would use the closed edge (22) and open bow (46).  This gave me more variation and expressive abilities.
I still do essentially the same thing in BFD, however I use the velocity layer capabilities of the Z4 and ZenEdit to change articulations based on how hard or soft I'm striking.

Anyway, I hope that might give you some ideas for squeezing extra dynamics and expressiveness from your rig.

 76 
 on: November 16, 2013, 11:51:41 AM 
Started by Jaay - Last post by Jaay
Greetings Tribe!  Wanted to solicit some opinions.

I'm running a TD-9 module as my main sound source, and I've noticed my hi-hats aren't quite doing it for me these days.  They feel a little too loud in the mix, too compressed (not getting as much dynamics as I'd like, all one level) and while the final product I'm hearing on tapes and such isn't BAD, I want it to be better.

I'm running the last gen operating system in my instrument, so setting individual trigger curves is not an option for me.  The other thing that occurs to me is perhaps to take down the hi-hats in my module's mixer but perhaps pitch them a little higher so they still cut through if I want them to?  Input is welcome; thank you kindly.

-Jaay

 77 
 on: November 12, 2013, 12:12:29 AM 
Started by Jaay - Last post by digitalDrummer
Hi Jaay. There's a very active Zendrum group on Facebook, where a lot of these developments have been flagged. You'll also find the artwork there for the Tshirt. And we covered the new model in digitalDrummer in the John Emrich profile (remember, the magazine for which you wrote a couple of articles??) and again this month in E Doctor Smith article.
Allan

 78 
 on: November 10, 2013, 11:36:50 AM 
Started by jonathanm - Last post by jonathanm
Hi, I'm left handed, and was wondering about holding a ZX the "wrong way" - ie with left hand on top, and right hand underneath, a bit like a left handed guitar.

How does the ZX "sit" if held like that? I mean in terms of balance, on the strap etc. Does anyone use it like that, or does anyone have a photo of it being held like that, which might help me to envisage if it would work for me?

Thanks :)

 79 
 on: November 08, 2013, 08:39:34 AM 
Started by tigerxchaos - Last post by Jaay
Hey there!  Had new information that I felt warranted its own post.

According to 109, the power switch can be bypassed so that when the main cable's plugged in to the instrument, the instrument is powered on.  He says it's not risky any kind of way and it's how all Zendrums are shipped that don't have the internal wireless.

If you're very concerned about your switch, perhaps this is an option?

-Jaay

 80 
 on: November 08, 2013, 08:34:28 AM 
Started by Jaay - Last post by Jaay
Greetings all!  I came across an interesting thing today, wanted to share it, get some thoughts.

I was doing research today and came across Pedaltrain's website; they've released a new, portable power supply called "Volto".  The idea behind it is to get rid of the wall-wart in a guitarist's pedal chain; one cable to the guitar, one to the amp.

My main rig is mains-powered (appropriate, huh?), but I do have a battery-powered rig.  Three seperate components (module, amp, and Battery Box), all battery-powered.  I'm wondering if this might be a better option to go with.  Here's my thoughts:

PROS:
-I could use this unit to power both my main and auxiliary rigs
-USB power supply would eliminate one type of charger I'd need to have in the house
-9 hours of battery life should be enough for most reasonable gigs, especially if I can charge it back up in the car on the way home
-Eliminates battery waste (1 power supply instead of the 12 AAs and 1 9V I currently need)

CONS:
-Using this for my battery-powered rig would require cabling everything together, knocking out some of the portability of the rig.
-If the power on one goes, it all goes (as opposed to before, when everything was compartmentalized)
-related to the first point; if I just wanted to use one component, I have to mate it to the power supply instead of using the batteries.

So, it seems like the biggest drawback is adding one component to the aux rig, and the biggest benefit is being able to power the main rig.  Thoughts?

-Jaay

Pages: 1 ... 6 7 [8] 9 10